Production-Specific Code on Eleventy

In setting up a blog, it's generally good to have some sort of analytics, even if it's personal writing. I expect my traffic to be in the single digits in any given week, but it's nice to know what pages do end up showing up highly on search engines, so I could potentially clean them up. In addition, if I ever end up getting linked somewhere on social media, I'll know where to look to get all the free editing I could imagine! However, in doing so, I want to make sure that I don't worry about loading that script while I'm working in development. This is a great situation to use shortcodes in Eleventy.

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Eleventy and Snowpack

I'm pretty certain that anyone that rebuilds their personal site using a Jamstack setup of some sort is contractually obligated to spend the next half dozen posts they write describing their setup. I don't expect to be much different. In my defense... well, I have none. Admittedly, a lot of these posts, as a lot of my writing, tends to be more to help cement concepts personally, as one would do with documentation at a job. If someone else happens to learn something besides me, then all the better! In addition, personal sites are wonderful as they give us the ability to play around with new technology without having to shoehorn it into an existing project, and avoiding having weigh the pros and cons of potential technical debt we could accrue if the new technology ends up not being a long lasting project. I've wanted to try out the new frontend build tools that have been coming out, and I settled with using Snowpack.

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Five Things I Wish I Knew When I Started Using Drupal

I noticed the other day that my account on Drupal.org is coming up to its three year anniversary, which means I've probably been working with Drupal for four years now. So I took a look back at some of the old Drupal sites I had put together, and like most developers, almost cringed at what I had done to some of those sites. So, with nearly four years under my belt, these are five things I wish I had been doing in 2005, when I started.

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